PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan


  • Paperback
  • 248
  • Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters
  • Matt Kaplan
  • English
  • 08 December 2020
  • 9781451667998

Matt Kaplan ☆ 6 Free read

Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters Summary ✓ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Modern audiences do not find dragons frightening Fascinating as mythical creatures yes but terrifying no Yet present them with a story about a virus that can kill a healthy adult in hours and they will have nightmares for weeks The difference between the two is believability Monsters are at their most frightening when they carry characteristics that tie them to the real world in some way Preposterous as they might seem today dragons were no different in ancient times Humans long ago stumbled upon. Monsters it turns out evolve over time Vampires didn t always sparkle zombies didn t always crave the taste of human brains and until very recently dementors didn t even exist Why is it that the monsters that left people shivering in terror during the bronze age are so different than the monsters of the industrial revolution which in turn are so different from the monsters today As society changes the things that people fear change and thus popular monsters change as well In his first solo book science journalist Matthew Kaplan takes us on an engaging romp through the history of monsters exploring not just what those monsters are but what they tell us about ourselvesKaplan is one of the top science journalists in the world and it shows His writing is clear lucid and even dare I say it funny He makes complex scientific concepts accessible to non specialists and his talent helps make this book an engaging and thought provoking read The book operates on two levels On the surface level this book looks at a number of popular and obscure monsters and tries to explain why people might have believed in them Perhaps the fossil record might have led people to speculate as to the sorts of creatures that could have created the bones they found Perhaps earthuakes could be the result of a rampaging minotaur or fiery natural gas explosions the work of a dragon While this is largely speculative the speculations are based in historical and scientific data The plausibility of the these discussions varies and the range is well captured by the book s title The discussion of vampires is extremely compelling I won t describe it further here because I can t do it justice Meanwhile the section on the Medusa strains credibility at one point Kaplan goes so far as to suggest that people may have believed in petrification because it would feel similar to going into shock Fortunately although no other section rises to the brilliance of the vampire discussion of the treatments are compelling or at least thought provoking than not Of course the uestion of why people might have believed in monsters presupposes the fact that people DID believe in them Here the book is on shakier ground When my mom watched the Harry Potter movies she had to close her eyes at the dementor scenes because she found them so scary but she doesn t actually believe in dementors Artists don t need to believe in a monster in order to depict it and in fact get credit for creativity if they can create monsters that are new or original And many of the grounds for belief that Kaplan sketches out would not have been accessible to the masses who believed Much of the fossil record or scientific data that Kaplan argues could have led monsters to seem plausible wouldn t have been known by anybody but the most elite scholars during antiuity So why this focus on why people might have believed in monstersThis leads us to the second layer of the book that monsters are likely to be talked about and persist in culture to the extent that they are legitimately scary And we are likely to fear something that we believe is a threat to us As such for monsters to endure in lore they must at least plausibly exist and if they were to exist plausibly represent a danger to us The latter of these premises is straightforward monsters that live in the forest are much scarier to a primitive forest society than an industrial society people who live in a city are less threatened by a giant lion but terrified of the vampire who can blend into urban life while stalking its prey Thus as people move to cities vampires will thrive while giant beasts become less terrifying And of course we do need to have some schema for how a monster could exist in order to be able to understand why to fear it For example it would be hard to be afraid of robots before electricity had been invented to power them But ultimately while I recognize that plausible things are probably scarier I also recognize that people are able to suspend disbelief Movies with downright absurd premises can still have terrifying monsters because we can imagine ourselves in the artificial worlds that the movie takes place I can fear the Nazgul in Lord of the Rings despite the fact that there is no conceivable way they could exist because I can empathize with Frodo s fear As such I didn t think the present book s focus on why people might believe in various monsters was all that informative regarding why those monsters are talked about Put in other words it is irrelevant whether or not the mechanism for producing dinosaurs in Jurassic Park is scientifically valid or not the average movie goer wouldn t know one way or the other and the fear comes not from the fact that dinosaurs may be actually creatable but rather projecting oneself into a world where they are hunting you A final thought about the book In the conclusion Kaplan discusses how in the movie Avatar the monsters Na vi are the protagonists and the humans become the monsters He speculates as to why this modern conception of humans as monsters has evolved I m not sure that this is really all that modern If you look at myths from antiuity there are some pretty monstrous humans Medea for example murders her own children in an attempt to get back at her lover Jason who s no paragon of virtue himself Mordred from Arthurian legend is pretty monstrous too One doesn t have to look far to find stories where humans are portrayed as monsters In other words modern conception of monster and its relation with man is uite nuanced and that was likely true historically as well but much of what we know about monster stories from history comes from oral histories and incomplete records Thus while it is undoubtedly true that monsters take new forms to fit the cultures in which they are discussed it is also true that we know much less about monsters of the past This makes it hard to know how much of the differences are about cultural changes and how much are due to lost recordsDespite my uibbles my overall impression of the book is uite positive While the arguments in this book sometimes seem a bit of a reach especially at the macro level the individual micro level discussion of the monsters tend to be really fun to read and very thought provoking Kaplan has clearly done his research and I feel like I learned a lot from this book about science monsters and culture If you like science journalism or want to know about monsters this book is definitely worth your time The Cost of Survival The System Apocalypse #3 upon. Monsters it turns out evolve over time Vampires didn t always sparkle zombies didn t always crave the taste of human brains and My Double Unveiled. the Dissipative Quantum Model of Brain. until very recently dementors didn t even exist Why is it that the monsters that left people shivering in terror during the bronze age are so different than the monsters of the industrial revolution which in turn are so different from the monsters today As society changes the things that people fear change and thus popular monsters change as well In his first solo book science journalist Matthew Kaplan takes The Bald TruthThe First Complete Guide To Preventing And Treating Hair Loss us on an engaging romp through the history of monsters exploring not just what those monsters are but what they tell Putting Food By us about ourselvesKaplan is one of the top science journalists in the world and it shows His writing is clear lucid and even dare I say it funny He makes complex scientific concepts accessible to non specialists and his talent helps make this book an engaging and thought provoking read The book operates on two levels On the surface level this book looks at a number of popular and obscure monsters and tries to explain why people might have believed in them Perhaps the fossil record might have led people to speculate as to the sorts of creatures that could have created the bones they found Perhaps earthuakes could be the result of a rampaging minotaur or fiery natural gas explosions the work of a dragon While this is largely speculative the speculations are based in historical and scientific data The plausibility of the these discussions varies and the range is well captured by the book s title The discussion of vampires is extremely compelling I won t describe it further here because I can t do it justice Meanwhile the section on the Medusa strains credibility at one point Kaplan goes so far as to suggest that people may have believed in petrification because it would feel similar to going into shock Fortunately although no other section rises to the brilliance of the vampire discussion of the treatments are compelling or at least thought provoking than not Of course the Le Coran des historiens (Bibliographie) (Cerf-Patrimoine) uestion of why people might have believed in monsters presupposes the fact that people DID believe in them Here the book is on shakier ground When my mom watched the Harry Potter movies she had to close her eyes at the dementor scenes because she found them so scary but she doesn t actually believe in dementors Artists don t need to believe in a monster in order to depict it and in fact get credit for creativity if they can create monsters that are new or original And many of the grounds for belief that Kaplan sketches out would not have been accessible to the masses who believed Much of the fossil record or scientific data that Kaplan argues could have led monsters to seem plausible wouldn t have been known by anybody but the most elite scholars during antiuity So why this focus on why people might have believed in monstersThis leads Se una notte d'inverno un viaggiatore us to the second layer of the book that monsters are likely to be talked about and persist in culture to the extent that they are legitimately scary And we are likely to fear something that we believe is a threat to The Cosmopolitan Canopy us As such for monsters to endure in lore they must at least plausibly exist and if they were to exist plausibly represent a danger to Harry Potter \u2013 Spells & Charms: A Movie Scrapbook us The latter of these premises is straightforward monsters that live in the forest are much scarier to a primitive forest society than an industrial society people who live in a city are less threatened by a giant lion but terrified of the vampire who can blend into Unclobber urban life while stalking its prey Thus as people move to cities vampires will thrive while giant beasts become less terrifying And of course we do need to have some schema for how a monster could exist in order to be able to Process Mining: Data Science in Action understand why to fear it For example it would be hard to be afraid of robots before electricity had been invented to power them But Corruptions et crédulité en médecine (Documents) ultimately while I recognize that plausible things are probably scarier I also recognize that people are able to suspend disbelief Movies with downright absurd premises can still have terrifying monsters because we can imagine ourselves in the artificial worlds that the movie takes place I can fear the Nazgul in Lord of the Rings despite the fact that there is no conceivable way they could exist because I can empathize with Frodo s fear As such I didn t think the present book s focus on why people might believe in various monsters was all that informative regarding why those monsters are talked about Put in other words it is irrelevant whether or not the mechanism for producing dinosaurs in Jurassic Park is scientifically valid or not the average movie goer wouldn t know one way or the other and the fear comes not from the fact that dinosaurs may be actually creatable but rather projecting oneself into a world where they are hunting you A final thought about the book In the conclusion Kaplan discusses how in the movie Avatar the monsters Na vi are the protagonists and the humans become the monsters He speculates as to why this modern conception of humans as monsters has evolved I m not sure that this is really all that modern If you look at myths from antiuity there are some pretty monstrous humans Medea for example murders her own children in an attempt to get back at her lover Jason who s no paragon of virtue himself Mordred from Arthurian legend is pretty monstrous too One doesn t have to look far to find stories where humans are portrayed as monsters In other words modern conception of monster and its relation with man is تقریرات مصدق در زندان uite nuanced and that was likely true historically as well but much of what we know about monster stories from history comes from oral histories and incomplete records Thus while it is Pitch Perfect: How to Say It Right the First Time, Every Time Hardcover undoubtedly true that monsters take new forms to fit the cultures in which they are discussed it is also true that we know much less about monsters of the past This makes it hard to know how much of the differences are about cultural changes and how much are due to lost recordsDespite my Bachs Keyboard Music: A Listeners Guide (Unlocking the Masters) uibbles my overall impression of the book is Cathy uite positive While the arguments in this book sometimes seem a bit of a reach especially at the macro level the individual micro level discussion of the monsters tend to be really fun to read and very thought provoking Kaplan has clearly done his research and I feel like I learned a lot from this book about science monsters and culture If you like science journalism or want to know about monsters this book is definitely worth your time

Review Ë PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Matt KaplanMedusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters

Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters Summary ✓ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Skeletons that had sharp teeth and talon like claws These fossils were real and some were frighteningly large Those who looked at them could only guess at how dangerous the animals that they belonged to must have been From such interactions dragons were born Yet in spite of ample physical evidence that dragons existed none were ever seen in the flesh Dragon bones were ultimately proven to be the bones of huge predatory dinosaurs like Tyrannosaurus Rex but before the mystery was solved they were. This book is amazing The author presents plausible scientific information explaining why ancient civilizations believed in different monsters as well as why the same monsters lost their ability to scare over time His wittiness breaks up the sometimes dry period of scientific data and several times throughout the nook made me laugh out loud This is a definite must read for anyone who wants to know where myths and legends came fromeven if you still want to believe at the end

Read Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters

Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters Summary ✓ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB The makings of frightening beasts that managed to evade human sight by lurking deep within the shadows of the wild The Science of Monsters will explore monsters that have haunted humanity throughout the ages from Medusa to sea serpents giants and vampires In each chapter Kaplan uses scientific principles current research and his thorough knowledge of the natural world to explain why specific monsters came to be and what it was about them that was so terrifying to the people who brought them to li. An entertaining accessible informative read that attempts to explain the scientific and psychological foundations of our most enduring monsters I enjoyed its light tone and uick pace found some of the history and science to be uite fascinating and loved all of the pop culture references and snarky asides Kaplan is certainly an entertaining author Not the heaviest or most impressive of texts but a diverting read


10 thoughts on “PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan

  1. says: Review Ë PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Matt Kaplan PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan Matt Kaplan ☆ 6 Free read

    PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan I really wanted to like this book I was psyched to hear Matt Kaplan on NPR and put my name in at the library so I was the first person to get

  2. says: Review Ë PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Matt Kaplan PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan Matt Kaplan ☆ 6 Free read

    Review Ë PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Matt Kaplan Matt Kaplan ☆ 6 Free read Read Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters Monsters it turns out evolve over time Vampires didn’t always sparkle zombies didn’t always crave the taste of human brains and until very recently dementors didn’t even exist Why is it that the monsters that left people shivering in terror during the bronze age are so different than the monsters of the industrial revolution which in turn are so different from the monsters today? As society changes the things that people f

  3. says: PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan

    Review Ë PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Matt Kaplan Matt Kaplan ☆ 6 Free read Read Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters Part of the entertainment factor of this book is the fact that it takes its theories too far After explaining Chimaera legends as t

  4. says: PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan

    Read Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters Matt Kaplan ☆ 6 Free read PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan In this entertaining look at beliefs in monsters of various sorts as with his recent book on magical powers Science of the Magical From the Holy Grail to Love Potions to Superpowers Matt Kaplan explores the ways in which science an

  5. says: PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan Matt Kaplan ☆ 6 Free read Read Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters

    PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan Read Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters Matt Kaplan does a really nice job balancing the scientific fact and evidence he presents with a sociological and psychological view of how these monsters have been depicted in art film and literaturefiction He gives a broad overview which helps the reader make connections between seemingly different monsters although I do wish there was detail for each section I could have kept on reading his clean prose fascinating research and humorous

  6. says: Read Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan Matt Kaplan ☆ 6 Free read

    Read Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan Review Ë PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Matt Kaplan This book is amazing The author presents plausible scientific information explaining why ancient civilizations believed in different monsters as well as why the same monsters lost their ability to scare over time His wittiness breaks up the sometimes dry period of scientific data and several times throughout the nook made me laugh out loud This is a definite must read for anyone who wants to know where myths and legends

  7. says: Review Ë PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Matt Kaplan Matt Kaplan ☆ 6 Free read PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan

    Review Ë PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Matt Kaplan PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan Some of the themes and characters in world mythology are near immortal They take a life on their own and evolve into myriad shapes and forms over the centuries A monster is one such character which has grown and metamorpho

  8. says: Review Ë PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Matt Kaplan Matt Kaplan ☆ 6 Free read Read Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters

    Read Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan Matt Kaplan ☆ 6 Free read An entertaining accessible informative read that attempts to explain the scientific and psychological foundations of our most enduring monsters I enjoyed its light tone and uick pace found some of the history and science to be uite fascinating

  9. says: Review Ë PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Matt Kaplan PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan

    PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan Teratology is an area of interest to me but this fell into the trap of so much non fiction in that it remained largely a li

  10. says: PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan

    PDF or EBOOK (Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite The Science of Monsters) ´ Matt Kaplan Review Ë PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Matt Kaplan 35 stars The first half of this book was a bit boring but the second half was really interesting perhaps because the monsters in the s

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